Mrs. Goat’s Greengrocery Display

Local citizen Mrs. Gail Goat is helping to spearhead a campaign to get the youth of Crabapple Crossings to embrace good nutritional habits. As a purveyor of fresh vegetables to the town, she is in a unique position to encourage healthy eating.

“I know that with my children, they sometimes turn up their noses at the veggies on their plates, afraid to try new things. At least with my kids, I have found that offering vegetables for them to taste without pressure, especially in their raw form seems to make the veggies less scary and more an exciting undertaking. So I decided to offer this to all the children of the village. After school, I will offer the children tastes of what vegetables I have available at no cost. I think the children of the town will be excited to get a free snack.”

While I was interviewing Mrs. Goat, several village children stopped by. Mrs. Goat offered Hugh Holstein some broccoli.

grocer story 2

At first Hugh wasn’t sure. “I’m not sure I like broccoli,” he said.

“That’s okay,” said Mrs. Goat. “But if you change your mind, I’ll be happy to give you some.”

“What do you think, should I try it?” Hugh asked his companion, Martin Mouse.

“I love broccoli!” Martin said. “I think you should at least taste it.”

grocer story 3

“Okay,” Hugh said. “I’ll give it a shot.” He bit into the broccoli. “Ooh, it’s a bit peppery. But it’s pretty good! Thank you, Mrs. Goat.”

“You’re welcome, Hugh” she replied.

grocer story 4

Meanwhile, Wesley Whitetail was peeking into the bin of pumpkins. “I don’t think you’ll like those so much, Wesley,” Mrs. Goat told the tot. “They need to be cooked to taste yummy. Why don’t you try this carrot instead? It’s orange like the pumpkins.”

grocer story 5

Wesley happily accepted the carrot and crunched happily on it. “Normally Wesley doesn’t like to eat his veggies,” said his older sister Winnie Whitetail. “But I guess he’s enjoying his carrot a lot!” she said as he finished. “I’m sure mama will be so happy to hear that Wesley has gained a new appreciation for a healthy snack!”

Mrs. Goat is already quite pleased with the success of her program. “If it gets just one child to discover a new favorite vegetable, I’ll call it a success. And I think today proved that it can work.”

Mrs. Goat’s greengrocery is open daily from 9 to 5. She offers seasonal vegetables at this time and hopes to offer a variety of fruits in the future.

The theme for the third round of Iron Craft was “G is for…” Our projects had to relate to a skill, material, or subject that begins with the letter “G.” I decided that Mrs. Goat’s Greengrocery would certainly fit this alphabet-based theme.

Greengrocer

This project was not as intensive as my last one, but I really should learn not to make so many projects that need to be “filled”!

I began this project by creating the crates based on this tutorial from about.com. They came together pretty easily, although I now see that I didn’t actually follow the tutorial particularly well. They turned out pretty nicely despite my apparent inability to follow directions.

I then built the stand. I wanted the crates to be on an angle, so I played around with different thicknesses of balsa wood. I eventually settled on a 3/8″ riser. I also used 1/8″ wood to create a little lip or stop at the fronts of the risers to keep the crates from sliding off. The entire project is made of these two widths of wood and 1/16″ wood sheets. After assembly, I painted it a fresh spring green.

Then I had to fill the crates (why do I keep doing this to myself!?) As it is winter here, I decided to primarily make winter vegetables. I also wanted a variety of colors to make the display more appealing. I use Premo Sculpey, because I have heard that it is one of the more stiff clays. I always have very warm hands, so I chose a clay that could withstand that. I also work on tile that I keep in the refrigerator when I’m not working on it. I realize I am very much in the minority with my hot hands, so it’s worthwhile doing some research to find what will work best for you.

I used a whole bunch of tutorials as a guideline for my veggies. Most of these tutorials are very involved and result in hyper-realistic veggies. I am not that much of a stickler for super-realism – my village inhabitants are anthropomorphic animals; a little cartoonishness is okay with me. (And I’m kind of lazy.) So these links are just guidelines – I definitely did not follow every step!

  1. Carrots (video)
  2. Eggplant/aubergine
  3. Parsnip (pretty much the same as carrots)
  4. Broccoli (video)
  5. Butternut squash (video)
  6. Potatoes (video)
  7. Beets (for general shape)
  8. Pumpkin (video; and see butternut squash video)

Some of the items I made enough to fill the crate; others I didn’t. For those that didn’t look full enough, I added some small bits of crumpled tissue paper on the bottom of the crates to give them a fuller look. I then made mini signs with some scrap paper and used a 01/.25 mm micron pen to write the signs. I used Scotch tape to stick them on. It’s really not sticking well, so I will need to find some other solution.

Greengrocer stand

This project was really fun. I truly enjoyed creating all the veggies and working with polymer clay. I’ve only done maybe one or two other projects with the clay, so this has been a great learning experience. Figuring out how to mix the clays I had to get the right colors was really interesting. I always had a reference image available for color matching and shaping. Are my items amazing? No, but they are effective-enough for my taste. And I can see why people are enthusiastic about polymer clay; it really is fun!

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One comment

  1. All your vids are so cool! I really like how you put your tutorials in video format. And I think the little story at the beginning is just so awesome!

    Like

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